Observing Lists

ASA Top 100

Below is a list of top 100 deep sky objects from the ASSA. All objects are listed in Right Ascension (RA) order so that you can view them as they rise, and so that you can properly plan your observing sessions to make the most of your observing time.

The list is being updated with interesting facts about each object, keep a lookout on our Facebook page where we will post when the list is updated.

We’re also looking for volunteers to help us with researching the objects in the list. If you would like to help please contact Kenny.

Note that the focus is on objects in the southern celestial sky, degrees < celestial equator 0o, From South Africa we can obviously see some of the northern objects like the Andromeda galaxy which is at 41o, but that is a topic for another list.

We hope that with this list you will enjoy the glorious southern skies.

Download the ASSA Top 100 Deep Sky Objects list

Far South Binocular List

Observing with binoculars is the best way to get started with astronomy. They are light, economical and easy to use. Universe Today has an article on which binoculars are good for astronomy. You will get the most enjoyment if you plan your observing sessions.

Below is a list of objects to look out for in the southern hemisphere. Its focus is on objects in the far south celestial sphere, the northern most object being NGC 2627 at -29o. You won’t find some of the more well known objects like the Orion nebula, which is at -5o, you can find it in the ASSA Top 100 Deep Sky Objects list.

All objects are listed in Right Ascension (RA) order so that you can view them as they rise, and so that you can properly plan your observing sessions to make the most of your observing time. Using a planetarium program, like Stellarium, you can find out what region of the sky, by RA, will be visible on any particular evening and to find the objects. Many of the objects are circumpolar so they will be visible all night.

Information provided on each object:

  • Catalog number
  • Right ascension
  • Declination
  • Magnitude
  • Type of object
  • Constellation

The following additional information is in progress, we’re looking for volunteers to help us with researching the objects in the list. If you would like to help please contact Kenny.

  • Interesting facts about the object
  • Distance from the Earth
  • Who discovered it and when

We hope that with this list you will enjoy the far southern skies, full of interesting objects not seen from the northern hemisphere.

Download the Far South Binocular List

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